Start Dating gibson humbucking pickups

Dating gibson humbucking pickups

Which made me wonder if the op-amp information in the original G-303/G-808 Service Manual Schematics refers to the very rare "version A" board.

Generally, the narrow pickup seems more common in earlier guitars, and the wider pickup is common with the later models.

I had been exchanging emails with GR-user Jonathan Prince, who had, once upon a time, ordered a replacement hex pickup from Roland. Mark Wire, it lays out all the technical information on the pickups that I had only surmised!

These op-amps are the top three 4558 op-amps in line with the 24-pin ribbon connector.

IC4, IC5 and IC6 op-amps are used to create the hex fuzz sound. The line-level amplifiers are surrounded by resistors for a simple gain circuit, and the hex fuzz amplifiers have the network of diodes used to create the fuzz sound.

According to the schematic, these resistors should be 10K, but in this rare G-707 circuit board, the resistors were only 1K.

This 10:1 ratio difference is in keeping with all the other changes.

If there is one guitar that has become the "gold standard" of guitar synthesizers, it has to be the Roland G-303 guitar.

No doubt much of the popularity of the G-303 comes from Pat Metheny, who has played this guitar year after year on stages across the world, always amazing audiences with the moving and emotional quality of the G-303 and GR-300 rig.

Mark lists the serial numbers of guitars that use the older style, #601 (or part number 22380601) divided pickups: G-202 before serial no. For the G-303, G-505 and G-808, each string needs two resistors changed, one effecting the synthesizer signal, and the other effecting the hex fuzz signal.

The G-202 has a different hex fuzz circuit, so only six resistors need to be changed.

There is another reason why the G-303 is so popular: it is just a really great guitar.